Archive for fruits

Focus On Fruit: Ataulfo Mango

Posted in Epicurean Chronicles, Epicurean Ventures, Focus On Fruit, Foodies Fodder, Gourmet, Health & Wellness, Nutrition, Uncategorized, Weight Management with tags , , , , , , , , , on April 25, 2012 by Angela


Super-Delicious!!!

I am completely in love with these mangoes at the moment because they have given my taste buds a reason to sing.

Early spring can be a challenging time to find good variety of fruit. Most of the apples are red, small & incredibly hard. And if you’re like me, you just grow tired of the can fruit after so long.

I frequent the farmer’s markets as much as possible but in the colder months and for optimal variety, I tend to shop at Whole Foods & Fresh Market. Shopping at these stores and the farmer’s markets have broaden my horizons tremendously.

I spotted these beauties one evening while I was attending a wine tasting and I decided to give them a whirl. I was about to purchase regular mangoes but they had a huge display of these and they were $1 ea. while the others were 2/$5.

They look a little different than most mangoes you’re accustomed to seeing because they’re oblong shaped. This varitey hails from Mexico and are excellent source for Vitamin C & fiber.

I am very pleased with what I’ve found and have been raving ever since!!

If you like tropical fruits (mango, papaya, guava, etc.) you will be greatly pleased with these.

Here I’ve shown one of the ways I added a little life to my salad (after I perfected my mango-cubing method…the first couple I just peeled and ate very sloppily)

Ingredients:

*spinach*
*spring mix*
*garlic sesame crumbles*
*ataulfo mango*
*Swiss emmenthaler cheese*
*spicy Thai & curry vinaigrette dressing*

~Peace & Blessings~

Focus on Fruit: Cranberry

Posted in Fitness, Focus On Fruit, Gourmet, Health & Wellness, Nutrition, Weight Management with tags , , , , , , , , , , on January 30, 2012 by Angela

Here’s a little info about one of my favorite salad ingredients…

As one of the few fruits native to North America, Native Americans used the cranberries as a staple as early as 1550. They ate cranberries fresh, ground, or mashed with cornmeal and baked it into bread. They also mixed berries with wild game and melted fat to form pemmican, a survival ration for the winter months. Maple sugar or honey was used to sweeten the berry’s tangy flavor.

By 1620 Pilgrims learned how to use cranberries from the Native Americans. There are several theories of how the berry was named. Germany and Dutch settlers named the berry “crane-berry” because it appeared to be the favorite food of cranes or the blossom resembles the head and neck of an English crane. Eventually craneberry was shortened to cranberry. By 1683 cranberry juice was made by the settlers.

The uses of cranberries are extensive — American whalers and mariners carried cranberries onboard to prevent scurvy while Indians brewed cranberry poultices to draw poison from arrow wounds and in tea to calm nerves as well as using the juice as a dye.

When eaten as part of a healthy diet, cranberries can help you maintain good health. Naturally fat free, cholesterol free, low sodium and a good source of dietary fiber, cranberries contain flavonoids and polyphenolics, natural compounds that promote health.

  • Heart Health

Cranberries are part of a heart-healthy diet. Cranberries are a fat free, cholesterol free, and low sodium food. Whole cranberries are a good source of dietary fiber, and all cranberry products contain flavonoids and polyphenolics, natural compounds that offer a wide range of potential health benefits.

Source: USCRANBERRIES & VEGETARIAN-NUTRITION INFO

November Seasonals

Posted in Health & Wellness, Nutrition with tags , , , , , , , on November 30, 2011 by Angela

These are typically the fruits and vegetables which are in season in many regions during the month of November and therefore most likely to be found in your local supermarket and/or farmer’s market.

This week/month I will feature from this list for Recipes for Health, Focus on Fruit & Focus on Vegetables. Also, you will see the month next to items which may have been previously highlighted so you can search the tags for any additional posts.

Of course, you will find some variance here and there by your state based on soil, climate, temperatures, etc but these are fairly standard for quite a bit of the United States.

Now, if you are environmentally conscience and trying to manage, reduce or maintain an ecological/carbon footprint then this information will matter very much to you for several reasons.

Reason 1a: you are more likely to find these items in quantity and usually on sale in the store therefore making them cost effective in terms of budgeting.

Reason 1b: those who are meal planners (and I am always shocked to hear how many aren’t) will basically have their grocery list set up for them and not a lot of running around store to store to see who has what. Also, allowing you to cook with fresh not frozen for optimal nutrients.

Reason 2: when you frequent farmer’s markets, produce stands or live in/near farming communities, like I prefer to do, you can save even more in price and benefit from top quality items that were just in the ground literally minutes/hours before coming to market.

Personally I like that farmers don’t sell by weight like supermarkets plus they tend to wheel & deal, barter and bargain with you quite often “throwing in extras for free”. As you establish relationships, they will even “hold back” items for you or reserve a special pick from the back of the truck for you. As a result, you can often walk away with quite a bit of fruits and vegetables for several days/meals at less than $10. That just doesn’t happen at the grocery store with any regularity.

I usually go to the market with $20 and almost never spend it all unless I am getting a bunch of other miscellaneous stuff like handmade soap, lotion or whatever else Mother Earth stuff they are showcasing that screams my name.

Reason 3: this can help those who have considered breaking ground of your own for a fruit/vegetable garden then this will give a little idea or information as to what you may wish to plant.

· apples [HEALTH & WELLNESS WEEK: SEPTEMBER]

· artichokes

· avocado

· beets

· bok choy

· broccoli

· brussels sprouts

· cabbage

· carrots

· celery

· chard

· chestnuts

· cranberries

· daikon

· fennel

· guava

· kiwi

· kumquat

· lemons

· orange

· pears

· persimmons

· pomegranate

· potato

· quince

· rutabaga

· squash, winter

· sunchoke

· turnips

· yams

October Seasonals

Posted in Health & Wellness, Nutrition with tags , , , , , , , on October 27, 2011 by Angela

These are typically the fruits and vegetables which are in season in many regions during the month of October and therefore most likely to be found in your local supermarket and/or farmer’s market.

This week/month I will feature from this list for Recipes for Health, Focus on Fruit & Focus on Vegetables. Also, you will see the month next to items which may have been previously highlighted so you can search the tags for any additional posts.

Of course, you will find some variance here and there by your state based on soil, climate, temperatures, etc but these are fairly standard for quite a bit of the United States.

Now, if you are environmentally conscience and trying to manage, reduce or maintain an ecological/carbon footprint then this information will matter very much to you for several reasons.

Reason 1a: you are more likely to find these items in quantity and usually on sale in the store therefore making them cost effective in terms of budgeting.

Reason 1b: those who are meal planners (and I am always shocked to hear how many aren’t) will basically have their grocery list set up for them and not a lot of running around store to store to see who has what. Also, allowing you to cook with fresh not frozen for optimal nutrients.

Reason 2: when you frequent farmer’s markets, produce stands or live in/near farming communities, like I prefer to do, you can save even more in price and benefit from top quality items that were just in the ground literally minutes/hours before coming to market.

Personally I like that farmers don’t sell by weight like supermarkets plus they tend to wheel & deal, barter and bargain with you quite often “throwing in extras for free”. As you establish relationships, they will even “hold back” items for you or reserve a special pick from the back of the truck for you. As a result, you can often walk away with quite a bit of fruits and vegetables for several days/meals at less than $10. That just doesn’t happen at the grocery store with any regularity.

I usually go to the market with $20 and almost never spend it all unless I am getting a bunch of other miscellaneous stuff like handmade soap, lotion or whatever else Mother Earth stuff they are showcasing that screams my name.

Reason 3: this can help those who have considered breaking ground of your own for a fruit/vegetable garden then this will give a little idea or information as to what you may wish to plant.

· Apples [HEALTH & WELLNESS WEEK: SEPTEMBER]

· Beets

· Blackberries

· Broccoli

· Brussels sprouts

· Cabbage

· Cauliflower

· Chicory

· Cranberries

· Dates

· Figs

· Grapes

· Leeks

· Lettuce

· Okra

· Oranges

· Parsnips

· Pears (late season)

· Peppers

· Pumpkins

· Quince

· Shallots

· Star fruit

· Sweet Potatoes

· Turnips

· Watercress

· Winter squash

September Seasonals

Posted in Epicurean Chronicles, Focus On Fruit, Focus on Veggies, Foodies Fodder, Gourmet, Health & Wellness, Nutrition with tags , , , , , , , on September 19, 2011 by Angela

These are typically the fruits and vegetables which are in season in many regions during the month of September and therefore most likely to be found in your local supermarket and/or farmer’s market.

This week/month I will feature from this list for Recipes for Health, Focus on Fruit & Focus on Vegetables. Also, you will see the month next to items which have been previously highlighted so you can search the tags for any additional posts.

Of course, you will find some variance here and there by your state based on soil, climate, temperatures, etc but these are fairly standard for quite a bit of the United States.

Now, if you are environmentally conscience and trying to manage, reduce or maintain an ecological/carbon footprint then this information will matter very much to you for several reasons.

Reason 1a: you are more likely to find these items in quantity and usually on sale in the store therefore making them cost effective in terms of budgeting.

Reason 1b: those who are meal planners (and I am always shocked to hear how many aren’t) will basically have their grocery list set up for them and not a lot of running around store to store to see who has what. Also, allowing you to cook with fresh not frozen for optimal nutrients.

Reason 2: when you frequent farmer’s markets, produce stands or live in/near farming communities, like I prefer to do, you can save even more in price and benefit from top quality items that were just in the ground literally minutes/hours before coming to market.

Personally I like that farmers don’t sell by weight like supermarkets plus they tend to wheel & deal, barter and bargain with you quite often “throwing in extras for free”. As you establish relationships, they will even “hold back” items for you or reserve a special pick from the back of the truck for you. As a result, you can often walk away with quite a bit of fruits and vegetables for several days/meals at less than $10. That just doesn’t happen at the grocery store with any regularity.

I usually go to the market with $20 and almost never spend it all unless I am getting a bunch of other miscellaneous stuff like handmade soap, lotion or whatever else Mother Earth stuff they are showcasing that screams my name.

Reason 3: this can help those who have considered breaking ground of your own for a fruit/vegetable garden then this will give a little idea or information as to what you may wish to plant.

  • Sweet potatoes
  • Sweet corn
  • Eggplant [HEALTH & WELLNESS WEEK: AUGUST]
  • Zucchini
  • Summer squash
  • Green beans
  • Curly Kale
  • Leeks
  • Tomatoes
  • Red Onions
  • Pumpkins
  • Grapes
  • Apples
  • Pears
  • Cherries [HEALTH & WELLNESS WEEK: JULY]
  • Raspberries
  • Kiwi
  • Plums